Fat in Food

Fat in Food

If you saw my previous video/recipe for Tortilla Quiche, you may be concerned about the fact that one serving of this recipe contains 2 eggs, due to the fat and cholesterol they contain. A lot of recent research has shown over the years that the fear of fat that permeated our culture in the 80s and 90s was overblown. As this article states: “In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980′s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.)” And regarding cholesterol, this article states: “But the biggest influence on blood cholesterol level is the mix of fats in the diet, not how much cholesterol you eat in food.” So eating a food with some cholesterol in it (like eggs) doesn’t automatically lead to more cholesterol in the body.

Fat is a necessary part of our diet – it’s one of the macronutrients, along with protein and carbohydrates. My opinion is that, if you are in generally good health, and are eating a diet of mostly unprocessed foods, then you can feel free to eat eggs, butter, and full-fat cheese. And if you are trying to lose weight, fat is a great thing for you, because it keeps you full longer. So-called “lite” recipes and “lite” food products that are extremely low-fat, marketed to dieters, can be a problem, because without much fat, they can make you feel hungrier than if you ate something else that had the same amount of calories, but had some fat. Not to mention that, in order to improve flavor and texture of these lite products, the fat is often replaced with chemicals that definitely don’t qualify as food. Remember Olestra? Read this article for more info about low-fat products.

That’s one reason I’ve mostly stopped eating boxed cereals, because they are often mostly carbs, and low in fat & protein. (I’m not against carbs, but I don’t think it’s good to have a lot of them without the other two macronutrients.) By making my own breakfast, and being sure to include fat & protein (in addition to carbs), I am eating about the same number of calories as before, but feeling full much longer. In future videos I’ll show some ideas for breakfasts. However, if you are uncomfortable eating 2 eggs with a single meal (or if you have a health condition that requires you to strictly limit fat intake), then certainly feel free to just use one egg. You can probably keep the amount of corn and cheese the same, but may want to add a bit more milk.